Emma, Part III

INT. STUDY ROOM. NIGHT. 1942.

EMMA (now eighteen years old) sits in her study doing some homework. The title of her essay is “How to be a Good German Mother.” She hears the door knock and goes to answer it.

INT. DOORWAY. NIGHT.

Emma answers the door to see HADON and BELINDA (also eighteen years old).

HADON:

Hello, Emma! We were going to

the market for some penny candy.

Care to join us?

EMMA:

Sure, let me go get my purse!

 

EXT. GEPANZERT AVENUE. NIGHT.

Emma, Hadon, and Belinda walk down the street, which is a very nice neighborhood. The marketplace is within view. The three stop when they see two Nazi officers pointing their machine guns at a young mother, who is kneeling down with a baby in her arms.

NAZI 1:

How dare you, Jew! Stealing food from

hard working Germans!

YOUNG MOTHER:

I’m sorry! I was trying to get some

decent food for my baby! He’s sick!

NAZI 2:

You ungrateful wench! The law is very

clear what must happen now!

YOUNG MOTHER:

No, please! I’ll put it back!

NAZI 1:

You must pay for your crime!

YOUNG MOTHER:

No, please!

NAZI 2:

You, filthy Jew, must die!

YOUNG MOTHER:

No!

The Nazi officers open fire on the woman and her baby. As the two lay bleeding and lifeless in the street, the Nazis start to laugh. Belinda and Hadon also laugh. Emma looks at the scene with horror.

BELINDA:

Come on! Let’s go get our candy.

EMMA:

Yes, candy. Let’s go.

They walk to the market.

 

INT. BEDROOM. LATE NIGHT.

Emma tosses and turns in her bed.

EXT. GEPANZERT AVENUE. NIGHT.

Emma relives the scene of the woman getting killed.

EXT. CAPITOL BUILDING. NOON.

Emma remembers saluting to the Nazi flag.

EXT. FREUNDSCHAFT STREET. EVENING.

Emma remembers the pitiful look on Nicklaus’s face as they beat him.

INT. FREDERIK AND MARTHE’S ROOM. EVENING.

Emma remembers her dad’s despair over not obtaining work.

EXT. GEPANZERT AVENUE. NIGHT.

Emma replaces the Nazis who killed the woman with her father, fully uniformed. She dreams that he is manically laughing as he kills the young mother.

INT. BEDROOM. LATE NIGHT.

Emma bolts up out of her sleep. She appears sweaty and scared. She gets up and braces against her vanity desk, breathing hard. She looks at the mirror and sees the look of fear in her eyes. In the mirror, she imagines she sees the eyes of the young mother and Nicklaus. She turns away from the mirror in shame.

EMMA:

We are human. They’re humans!

Emma starts to sob.

EMMA:

What have I done?

 

EXT. GIRL’S SCHOOL. AFTERNOON.

Emma walks with Belinda in a field surrounded by daffodils. B.G.-in the distance is a very square brick building. Other students of various ages run about the field. Everyone is wearing the same white dress. Emma drinks from her flask.

BELINDA:

Why do you always drink from that?

EMMA:

I prefer my own water.

BELINDA:

That doesn’t smell like water!

EMMA:

Are you going to rat me out?

BELINDA:

Of course not! We’re all here to

learn to behave like adults.

EMMA:

Do you want some?

BELINDA:

No. I can’t have any.

EMMA:

Why not?

BELINDA:

You know how we visit the boys school

every summer?

EMMA:

Yes, to learn how to “interact” with men.

BELINDA:

Yes, we’ve done this since we were about

thirteen, which is about when you started

drinking…

Belinda eyes Emma suspiciously.

EMMA:

Well, go on!

Belinda rubs her stomach.

EMMA:

You’re serious?

BELINDA:

Yes! I’m going to have a perfect child!

EMMA:

But you’re not married yet!

BELINDA:

Haven’t you been paying attention?

I will be a bride of Germany. Hitler

will be proud of the ideal child I

have created! He will be a weapon of

idealism against the evil Jews!

EMMA:

Are we sure that all Jews are evil?

BELINDA:

Of course we are! What kind of question

is that?

Belinda starts to sing Germany’s national anthem. Emma drinks more from her flask.

 

INT. LIVING ROOM. EVENING.

In a middle class living room, Marthe crochets a blanket. Emma enters the living room looking pale. Marthe puts down her things to tend to her daughter.

MARTHE:

What’s wrong?

EMMA:

Nothing. I just went by a ghetto.

MARTHE:

What? Why would you do that?

EMMA:

I just had to see for myself…

what it’s like…

MARTHE:

Oh. I wish you wouldn’t think

about these things.

EMMA:

They look like animals in an

overcrowded cage. The light in

their skin seems to have vanished.

All I could hear them talk about

was loved ones who were missing.

One girl said her friend found a

family to hide them in a basement.

MARTHE:

They must really love them to put

up risk of a concentration camp!

EMMA:

I didn’t see anything that seemed

evil.

MARTHE:

If they were evil, they’d hide it.

EMMA:

If? Mother, do you really believe

in this stuff?

MARTHE:

It doesn’t matter.

EMMA:

The truth matters!

MARTHE:

No, it doesn’t! We live in Germany,

and we must obey the law of the

country! Defying the Nazis only

leads to camps. As long as they

feel like they have our support,

we get to live our lives!

EMMA:

How could you support something so

vile? Accusing people of crimes they

have not committed? Letting them be

murdered? And we’re supposed to sit

at home and spout out more babies to

murder even more-

MARTHE:

That’s enough! You keep your thoughts

silent!

EMMA:

But-

MARTHE:

Promise me! I don’t want anything

to happen to you! So, no matter how

right you think you are, bite your

tongue! Would rather be where you

are now or where the Jews are going?

Emma stays silent. At that moment, Frederik comes home from work.

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