Crimes of the Fay, Chapter 19

“He’s a stinking human!” Giada thought about it for a second and then amended her statement, “Well, I don’t know if he’s actually stinking, I lost my sense of smell after I… you know…”

“Lucky you!” I remarked thinking about the state of that bathroom we found her in. “I’m in not interested in hearing why you switched from snorting drugs to injecting them. I just wanna know who killed you. Who is he?”

She shrugged. “I dunno. I never saw him before! Actually, I didn’t really see him at all. He had his hood over his face, and I didn’t recognize his voice either.”

I prompted her, “What can you tell us about him then? Tall? Short? Fat? Skinny?”

“He was just medium,” she recalled. “He had a green hoodie and blue jeans that covered his shoes. He had a real old, jagged wand too. Nothing special ’bout him. I wouldn’t have thought anything of him except he came into the ladies’ room.”

“Alright, so what happened between you two?” I asked. “A drug deal went bad?”

She answered, “Oh, hell no! I quit getting my stuff from humans a long time ago! Humans lie and cheat, they screw you over and they don’t even care! Fays got no other way to make money, so they work harder to get your business, you know?”

She reminded me of Aidan’s unusual custom of hiring Fays. He also had huge gaps of his company’s activities that weren’t accounted for, which made me wonder if his efforts in selling random odds and ends was just a front for a less legal skill. A part of me hate to think it, but this drew me to the conclusion that Aidan set up both the drug deal and the assassination! I couldn’t prove any of that, so I didn’t voice those thoughts. Instead, I picked up on another aspect she had raised. “We found a wad of cash and empty needles on your human body, so we know that you were there for a purchase. You don’t buy your drugs from humans, so your killer isn’t your dealer. Did this Fay you buy from leave before the murder?”

“Yeah.” She nodded. “She left when…”

“When what?” I probed. “Look, whatever illegal activity you were involved in, I don’t care! If you want those charges dropped, I need to tell the DA a reasonable story of what happened. I can’t do much with a creepy guy showing up to the women’s bathroom.”

She began to lose a lot of her bravado at this point, and even though Verne urged her to give an account of what happened, she seemed extremely reluctant. Eventually, she told me, “My dealer showed up, and as I went up to her, she started coughing. Then when we saw the light, she left.”

I queried, “The light? Did he teleport into the bathroom?”

“No, he…” She caught herself as she she almost revealed something she hadn’t intended to, and she tried to cover her tracks with, “… Uh, yeah, he teleported.”

“I can’t make any deals with you if you lie to me,” I warned her.

She snapped back, “Why does it matter how he got there? He just came in, okay?”

I let her know, “The way the killer came in and out of the scene is crucial in solving a murder case! We have to present all the facts at trial. If we leave anything out, the defense will call for a mistrial and the whole thing will have been a waste of time! How they entered and exited shows intent, it tells us how much planning they put into it. It could say a lot about their motives too. Why did they enter the room? Did they hear something that triggered them? Or did they know exactly who they were going after all along? We have to know that detail, and, quite frankly, I don’t see what the big deal is. Why would you want to hide this fact from us?”

“I’ve said too much already!” she bemoaned. “He’s gonna kill me again, and I’m going to Hell for sure!”

“Well, I guess it’s your choice then. You can let your last view of Earth be a prison cell, or you can have a small shot of going to Heaven by helping us out. It’s up to you.” Her behavior reminded me of Dahlia’s, and Dahlia chose to take her chances in prison rather than risk the wrath of this sociopath, so I sort of expected Giada to take that route too. I could see the gears in her brain heading towards that same direction, and I had to quickly think of something to sway Giada from doing that. I compared the two Fay women, and I did make one notable exception. Suddenly, it became clear of what might convince her to tell us what she knew. “I bet there’s lots of humans in Hell! What a shame it’d be to get stuck with them for all of eternity!”

I had no idea how many humans would actually land themselves there, and I sort of hated myself for using that vile, anti-human rhetoric like that, but I’m glad I did because clearly the concept I presented scared her into going the other direction. “He opened up the Ploutonion! There, happy?” We stared blankly at her, and she reacted irritably, “Seriously? You’ve never heard of the Ploutonion?”

Sandra inquired, “Are they, like, a band or something?” Giada gave her a judgmental stare, so Sandra scolded her, “Don’t give me that look! My daughter’s kid always does that to me! I kept up with the trends as a kid, and I tried to keep up with what my daughter was into; I give up with this generation!”

“Your daughter’s kid?” I responded in slight shock. “You’re a-?”

“Call me Nana!” she requested. “I had a kid young, and so did she.”

Verne piped in, “No one would have ever guessed you were old enough to be a… nana!”

Giada interjected, “Is this an afternoon tea or a murder investigation? Can we get on with this?”

“Sorry!” I blushed a little since a witness called me out on my lack of professionalism, and I snapped myself back into a proper composure. “So, a Ploutonion is a way to travel then?”

“No!” She obviously had no interest in educating us, but she knew she didn’t really have a choice right then. “When people turn into Fays, they’re stripped of all their Earthly powers. The one and only ability we get is the power to go into the Other World. It’s, like, a dimension between Heaven and Hell, and we can go there to plead our case about where we belong. Most people don’t bother ’cause it’s like talking to the wall, but it’s always there for people to try. Well, that’s the theory anyways. Most Fay just sleep there or whatever.”

After jotting this new information down as fast as I could, I queried, “Are humans allowed into this realm?”

She replied, “Yeah. They’re allowed to go in to help make the case for a Fay, but I doubt that this dude who killed me was doing that!”

“There’s something we can agree on!” I commended her, and I think it surprised her to have us get on the same page about something. “Okay, so you go to the particular spot for a drug deal, and the killer pops out and kills you. Can they see what’s happening on Earth from the Ploutonion?”

“No. I think my dealer set me up!” Giada lamented. “I’m never using her again!”

I recommended to her, “Yeah, I wouldn’t either!” Once again, I could tell I surprised her by agreeing with her. I then questioned her, “Did this dealer hop into the Ploutonion after the killer came?” She nodded in confirmation. “Alright, so what happened next? Did he kill you right away?”

She reported, “No. He told me I got chosen to survive, and then he took out his wand and tried to kill me! It didn’t make any sense, but I had to fight back. We were shooting spells at each other, and then he started saying how he’s working on ending the world ’cause humans were just too sinful and didn’t deserve to live on this planet anymore. He said, in the end, Fays would be the only ones left on Earth, so it stopped making sense for me to stay human. I figured if I turned into a Fay, I’d have a chance of making it out of the apocalypse. I’d have more time to make sure I didn’t get sent to Hell!”

It took us a minute to absorb all this. Throughout my childhood, I heard tales of Fay Folks relishing in the mischief and harm that they did to humans, but I had no idea that they had a much darker purpose! Then again, the idea didn’t really come from them, the murderer devised that plot! It saddened me to think that somewhere out there, a magian detested humans so much that he actively sought to destroy them all, and the idea that Aidan could have been that guy made my stomach churn! I couldn’t wrap my head around that, and, for a moment, I forgot about the investigation entirely, so Sandra filled the void by asking, “So, the pipes got destroyed during the battle? Did you see him write that message on the wall?”

“Yeah, a couple things broke when we were fighting. I didn’t see anyone write any message. What’d it say?”

“It just had some very anti-human sentiment to it.” I wanted to appease her a bit so she could tell us more, but I didn’t want to divulge too many details to her. She might have run into the killer again, and I had no intentions of letting him know how much we knew.

Verne took a look at his files and denoted, “Ah, yes! That was part of her charges too, defacing public property by using bio-hazardous materials. I’m assuming blood?”

“That would have been nice!” Sandra mumbled. Verne and Giada glanced at her in disconcertion, and I didn’t blame them! I don’t think most people could envision a scenario more appalling than a message written in blood, and prior to the previous day, I couldn’t have imagined anything worse, but I learned that a message written in excrement is far more disturbing!

“Anyways…” I could see Sandra showing signs of wanting to declassify that tidbit to them, so I cut her off before she could even start. “Can you give us your drug dealer’s contact info before you go?”

Giada gave me a peculiar stare. “You don’t have my cellphone?” I shook my head. “That sucks! How am I supposed to get a new one now?”

I assured her, “Since it’s part of our investigation, we’ll look for it and give it back to you when we’re done processing it for evidence.”

“You’d do that for me even thought I’m just a druggie and a Fay?” she pondered.

“It’s the right thing to do,” I stated firmly. “Just let us know if she contacts you.”

Her expression softened a bit after hearing that. “Alright.” She wouldn’t make eye contact with me at this point, and I guessed that she wasn’t used to having a human act kindly towards her. I kind of felt sorry for her, and as Verne escorted her out, I watched her walk down the hall and sincerely wished her well. I hoped that she would find a way to turn her life around so she could get into Heaven, and I hoped that my suspect wouldn’t murder her before she got the chance!

Just as I thought about the bad guy of my case, I watched Aidan walk out the door of his interrogation room! It utterly bewildered me to see him moving in Giada’s direction, and a part of me wanted to run after him and stop him from doing whatever sinister action that he had planned. I suppressed that notion when I saw Chief Mazarine walk out of the room, and then I just felt confused. I knew that Chief Mazarine had a rather cold attitude towards me, but I thought he had too much integrity to let a guilty person walk free! I couldn’t envision a solid reason why anyone would willingly let a potentially dangerous man loose on the streets either, and yet there he was, so I felt really confused now! Chief Mazarine spotted us, and as he approached us, he observed, “Ah, you finished your questioning too.”

“What’s going on?” I watched Aidan walk out the door, and my heart started to race! Giada didn’t mention anything about the killer having someone that he worked for, but I still believed that Aidan played a hand in orchestrating that event, so I just couldn’t fathom why nobody prevented Aidan from leaving the building! For a second there, I thought maybe Aidan had tricked them into letting him go free, and I wondered if I should do something about it…

“Aidan lawyered up,” Chief Mazarine filled me in. “We couldn’t find any evidence of his guilt, so we decided to clear him as a suspect.”

One thought on “Crimes of the Fay, Chapter 19

  1. pranavsable says:

    amazing blog……………..plz check out my ch 6,7,8 and give yr views

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